7 Architecture Building Design By Renzo Piano

Oct 15, 2019

1. Sanctuary of Saint Pio of Pietrelcina:-

The Sanctuary of Saint Pio of Pietrelcina is a Catholic shrine in San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy, owned by the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin of the Province of Foggia. Its surface area is 6,000 square meters. Built in devotion to Saint Pio of Pietrelcina, it can accommodate 6,500 people seated at worship, with standing room for 30,000 people outside. The Genoan architect Renzo Piano designed the church. It is located in front of Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza (Home for Relief of the Suffering), a big Italian hospital and research center, founded by Padre Pio.

2. Art Institute of Chicago Building:-

The Art Institute of Chicago Building houses the Art Institute of Chicago, and is part of the Chicago Landmark Historic Michigan Boulevard District in the Loop community area of Chicago, Illinois. The building is located in Grant Park on the east side of Michigan Avenue, and marks the third address for the Art Institute. The building was built for the joint purpose of accommodating the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition and subsequently the Art Institute. The core of the current complex, located opposite Adams Street, officially opened to the public on December 8, 1893, and was renamed the Allerton Building in 1968.

3. Whitney Museum of American Art:-

The Whitney Museum of American Art – known informally as the "Whitney" – is an art museum located in Manhattan. It was founded in 1931 by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney (1875–1942), a wealthy and prominent American socialite and art patron after whom the museum is named.The Whitney focuses on 20th- and 21st-century American art. Its permanent collection comprises more than 21,000 paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, films, videos, and artifacts of new media by more than 3,000 artists. It places a particular emphasis on exhibiting the work of living artists for its collection as well as maintaining an extensive permanent collection containing many important pieces from the first half of the last century. The museum's Annual and Biennial exhibitions have long been a venue for younger and less well-known artists whose work is showcased there.

4. Grattacielo Intesa Sanpaolo:-

The building is the third tallest in the city, after the landmark Mole Antonelliana which has held the record since 1889, and Piedmont Region Headquarters. It provides office accommodation for more than 2,000 employees as well as providing leisure facilities for the general public. At its summit, a rooftop greenhouse houses Piano35, a public restaurant, alongside a roof garden and a panoramic terrace that provides far-reaching views over the city. At its base, a 364-seat multifunctional public hall/auditorium is hung from the transfer trusses four stories above ground level.

5. Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art:-

The Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art is a privately owned contemporary art gallery in Oslo in Norway. It was founded and opened to the public in 1993. The collection's main focus is the American appropriation artists from the 1980s, but it is currently developing towards the international contemporary art scene, with artists like Jeff Koons, Richard Prince, Cindy Sherman, Matthew Barney, Tom Sachs, Doug Aitken, Olafur Eliasson and Cai Guo-Qiang. The museum gives 6-7 temporary exhibitions each year. Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art collaborates with international institutions, and produces exhibitions that travels worldwide. In 2012 the museum moved to two new buildings designed by Renzo Piano on Tjuvholmen.

6. California Academy of Sciences:-

The California Academy of Sciences is a natural history museum in San Francisco, California, that is among the largest museums of natural history in the world, housing over 26 million specimens. The Academy began in 1853 as a learned society and still carries out a large amount of original research, with exhibits and education becoming significant endeavors of the museum during the 20th century. Completely rebuilt in 2008, the building covers 400,000 square feet and is among the newest natural history museums in the United States. The primary building in Golden Gate Park reopened on September 27, 2008.

7. Harvard Art Museums:-

The Harvard Art Museums are part of Harvard University and comprise three museums: the Fogg Museum (established in 1895), the Busch-Reisinger Museum (established in 1903), and the Arthur M. Sackler Museum (established in 1985) and four research centers: the Archaeological Exploration of Sardis (founded in 1958), the Center for the Technical Study of Modern Art (founded in 2002), the Harvard Art Museums Archives, and the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies (founded in 1928). The three museums that constitute the Harvard Art Museums were initially integrated into a single institution under the name Harvard University Art Museums in 1983. The word "University" was dropped from the institutional name in 2008.